Kamuli District To Host World Sickle Cell Day

Sickle Cell is an inheritable, genetic and fatal disease Sickle Cell is an inheritable, genetic and fatal disease INTERNET PHOTO

Sickle cell remains a health concern among Ugandan families and this month all ayes will be focusing on Kamuli when it hosts the World Sickle Cell Day celebration on 19th June, 2017.

World Sickle Cell Day was established by the United Nations General Assembly in 2008 in order to increase the awareness about the sickle cell disease and its cure among the common public. It was celebrated first time on 19th of June in 2009.

Sickle cell disease has become a common and foremost genetic disease worldwide which is must to cure through the fast awareness campaign, curable activities, early diagnosis and management.

United Nations General Assembly (63rd session) has declared the 19th of June to be celebrated as the World Sickle Cell Day annually to cover almost all the curable criteria through the fast awareness campaign to take this genetic health condition under control all over the world. Variety of promotional activities has also been started by the World Health Organization on worldwide level to resolve this hemoglobin dysfunction issue.

It is an inheritable, genetic and fatal disease causing red blood cells disorders which has been classified as sickle cell anemia and may lead to death. It is the most common public health problem in the African and Asian countries of the world.

Sickle cell anemia means person suffering from anemia (less number of hemoglobin) due to the abnormal shaped red blood cells which gets stuck in their small blood vessels and cause blockage in the continuation of the blood flow in the blood vessels and whole body organs cannot get proper oxygen which leads to the common health problems like severe pain, organ damage or failure, severe infections, stroke, headache, liver problems, heart problems and so many.

Last modified onMonday, 05 June 2017 22:37

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